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ERIC Number: EJ1006782
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Feb
Pages: 7
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 17
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-006X
Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorders and Obesity among Female College Students: 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up Effects
Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, v81 n1 p183-189 Feb 2013
Objective: Evaluate the effects of a prevention program targeting both eating disorders and obesity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Method: Female college students at risk for these outcomes because of body image concerns (N = 398) were randomized to the "Healthy Weight 2" group-based 4-hr prevention program, which promotes lasting healthy improvements to dietary intake and physical activity and nutrition science health behavior change principles, or an educational brochure control condition. Results: Intervention participants showed significantly less body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptoms and lower eating disorder onset through 2-year follow-up versus controls, but the former 2 effects were small. There were no main effects for body mass index (BMI), depressive symptoms, dieting, caloric intake, physical activity, or obesity onset. Moderator analyses revealed stronger eating disorder symptom effects for youths with initially elevated symptoms and lower pressure to be thin, stronger BMI effects for youths with initially elevated symptoms and BMI scores, and weaker eating disorder symptom effects for youths with initially elevated pressure to be thin. Conclusions: The 60% reduction in eating disorder onset over the 2-year follow-up was clinically significant and a novel effect for a prevention program, but the main effects on continuous outcomes were small, suggesting that adding nutrition science principles weakened the intervention efficacy. Effects on both eating disorder symptoms and BMI were greater for those with elevated eating disorder symptoms and BMI at pretest, implying that it might be useful to target these individuals in future trials. (Contains 3 tables, 2 figures and 9 footnotes.)
American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org/publications
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A