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ERIC Number: EJ1006544
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 8
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 14
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1074-2956
Using Precorrection as a Secondary-Tier Intervention for Reducing Problem Behaviors in Instructional and Noninstructional Settings
Ennis, Robin Parks; Schwab, James Raymond; Jolivette, Kristine
Beyond Behavior, v22 n1 p40-47 Fall 2012
Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have academic, behavioral, and social characteristics that present unique needs within schools. Educators across the country are responding to the academic, behavioral, and social needs of all students, including students with E/BD, by implementing a continuum of supports across a three-tiered model of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS). Many schools experience increases in positive interactions between staff and students as well as decreases in office discipline referrals (ODRs) after consistently implementing PBIS at the primary level, including procedures for teaching, reinforcing, and monitoring behavior. One effective teaching practice that educators may use as a secondary-tier interventions (STI) to respond to behavior problems is precorrection. Precorrection is a preventive behavioral strategy where predictable contexts that result in problem behaviors are identified and then teachers provide students with prompts and reinforcement for successful participation within a given context. Precorrection is a systematic process that involves seven steps that effective teachers can apply to prevent the future occurrence of problem behaviors. These steps are discussed in this article. (Contains 3 figures.)
Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders. Council for Exceptional Children, 1110 North Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22201-5704. Tel: 612-276-0140; Fax: 612-276-0142; Web site: http://www.ccbd.net/publications
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A