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ERIC Number: EJ1005641
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-May
Pages: 10
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 74
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1058-0360
Nonlinguistic Learning in Individuals with Aphasia: Effects of Training Method and Stimulus Characteristics
Vallila-Rohter, Sofia; Kiran, Swathi
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, v22 n2 pS426-S437 May 2013
Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to explore nonlinguistic learning ability in individuals with aphasia, examining the impact of stimulus typicality and feedback on success with learning. Method: Eighteen individuals with aphasia and 8 nonaphasic controls participated in this study. All participants completed 4 computerized, nonlinguistic category-learning tasks. Learning ability was probed under 2 methods of instruction: feedback-based (FB) and paired-associate (PA). The impact of task complexity on learning ability was also examined, comparing 2 stimulus conditions: typical and atypical. Performance was compared between groups and across conditions. Results: The controls were able to successfully learn categories under all conditions. For the individuals with aphasia, 2 patterns of performance arose: One subgroup of individuals was able to maintain learning across task manipulations and conditions; the other subgroup demonstrated a sensitivity to task complexity, learning successfully only in the typical training conditions. Conclusion: Results support the hypothesis that impairments of general learning are present in individuals with aphasia. Some individuals demonstrated the ability to extract category information under complex training conditions; others learned only under conditions that were simplified and that emphasized salient category features. Overall, the typical training condition facilitated learning for all of the participants. Findings have implications for treatment, which are discussed. (Contains 3 tables and 4 figures.)
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Tel: 800-638-8255; Fax: 301-571-0457; e-mail: subscribe@asha.org; Web site: http://ajslp.asha.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Massachusetts