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ERIC Number: EJ1005202
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Mar
Pages: 17
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 90
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0361-6843
How Can Women Escape the Compensation Negotiation Dilemma? Relational Accounts Are One Answer
Bowles, Hannah Riley; Babcock, Linda
Psychology of Women Quarterly, v37 n1 p80-96 Mar 2013
Policy makers, academics, and media reports suggest that women could shrink the gender pay gap by negotiating more effectively for higher compensation. Yet women entering compensation negotiations face a dilemma: They have to weigh the benefits of negotiating against the social consequences of having negotiated. Research shows that women are penalized socially more than men for negotiating for higher pay. To address this dilemma, the authors test strategies to help women improve both their negotiation and social outcomes in compensation negotiations. In Study 1, communicating concern for organizational relationships improved female negotiators' social outcomes, and offering a legitimate account for compensation requests improved negotiation outcomes. However, neither strategy--alone or in combination--improved both women's social and negotiation outcomes. Study 2 tested two strategies devised to improve female negotiators' social and negotiation outcomes by explaining why a compensation request is legitimate in relational terms. Results showed that, although adherence to the feminine stereotype is insufficient, using these "relational accounts" can improve women's social and negotiation outcomes at the same time. Normative implications of conformity to gender stereotypes to reduce gender pay disparities are discussed. (Contains 2 tables, 2 figures and 5 notes.)
SAGE Publications. 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320. Tel: 800-818-7243; Tel: 805-499-9774; Fax: 800-583-2665; e-mail: journals@sagepub.com; Web site: http://sagepub.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Adult Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A