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ERIC Number: EJ1003533
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2013-Jan
Pages: 19
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0010-0277
Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia: Testing the Predictions of the Dual-Route and Connectionist Frameworks
Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.
Cognition, v126 n1 p20-38 Jan 2013
We investigated the phonological and surface subtypes of developmental dyslexia in light of competing predictions made by two computational models of single word reading, the Dual-Route Cascaded Model (DRC; Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001) and Harm and Seidenberg's connectionist model (HS model; Harm & Seidenberg, 1999). The regression-outlier procedure was applied to a large sample to identify children with disproportionately poor phonological coding skills (phonological dyslexia) or disproportionately poor orthographic coding skills (surface dyslexia). Consistent with the predictions of the HS model, children with "pure" phonological dyslexia, who did not have orthographic deficits, had milder phonological impairments than children with "relative" phonological dyslexia, who did have secondary orthographic deficits. In addition, pure cases of dyslexia were more common among older children. Consistent with the predictions of the DRC model, surface dyslexia was not well conceptualized as a reading delay; both phonological and surface dyslexia were associated with patterns of developmental deviance. In addition, some results were problematic for both models. We identified a small number of individuals with severe phonological dyslexia, relatively intact orthographic coding skills, and very poor real word reading. Further, a subset of controls could read normally despite impaired orthographic coding. The findings are discussed in terms of improvements to both models that might help better account for all cases of developmental dyslexia. (Contains 5 tables and 3 figures.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A