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ERIC Number: EJ1001540
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Nov
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 24
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0034-5237
Emotional Abuse of Secondary School Students by Teachers in Edo State, Nigeria
Aluede, Oyaziwo; Ojugo, A. I.; Okoza, Jolly
Research in Education, v88 p29-39 Nov 2012
This study examined the forms of emotional abuse experienced by students and the percentage of victims that experience the various forms of emotional abuse. The survey design was adopted for this study. A total of 1,559 students drawn from public secondary schools in Edo State, Nigeria, who were randomly selected through the multi-stage proportionate sampling process participated in the study. The instrument used for the study was the Classroom Emotional Abuse Scale, which was adapted from several emotional abuse scales. The results indicated that out of the eight forms of emotional abuse surveyed in the study, a majority of the participants experienced seven, namely, terrorising (86.2 per cent), dominating (83.3 per cent), discriminating (82.8 per cent), rejecting (74.7 per cent), verbal assaulting (74.1 per cent), ignoring (69.0 per cent) and degrading (66.4 per cent). The study further revealed that a small segment of the sampled students (33.6 per cent) experienced isolating as a form of emotional abuse. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended among others that school counsellors should help to educate teachers to discard the use of punishment in the classroom in correcting inappropriate behaviours, rather, teachers should be encouraged to promote the use of verbal reprimands, such as the use of corrective words that are focused on the spot behaviour of the child/student. These include, politely ask a child/student to stop making noise in the classroom or politely ask a child/student to go back to his/her seat if found wandering about within or outside the classroom. Second, ministries of education and school boards should carry out awareness programmes to enlighten school heads, teachers and even students about the dimensions and consequences of emotional abuse. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Nigeria