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ERIC Number: ED574521
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Oct
Pages: 35
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 58
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Typology for Understanding the Career and Technical Education Credit-Taking Experience of High School Students
Aliaga, Oscar A.; Kotamraju, Pradeep; Stone, James R., III
National Research Center for Career and Technical Education
This study describes a typology that allows us to explore and analyze the career and technical education (CTE) credit-taking experience of all high school students, not just those traditionally considered CTE (or vocational) students. We argue that this new typology provides a better framework for understanding CTE than the more traditional approach that classifies students as either academic or vocational concentrators. A typology like the one introduced in this paper is necessary because academic requirements have increased for all high school students in the United States, including those considered vocational students, and because most students, not just vocational students, participate in CTE at some level. Acknowledging these facts better reflects the varied nature of students' high school CTE credit-taking experiences. We propose this typology using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002), collected by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) of the U.S. Department of Education. Our analyses of ELS:2002 data using this typology show that the typology provides a more effective means of understanding the credit-taking experience of high school students than analyses based on dichotomous, vocational versus academic frameworks. Our analyses show that about 17% of all high school students complete high-intensity CTE in addition to their academic requirements. Although CTE has historically targeted low-income and special populations, our study reveals high levels of participation among higher income students and those with parents with higher levels of educational achievement. Positive results were also found for academic outcomes, such as a high rate of high-intensity CTE participation among students who were also enrolled in advanced mathematics and, to a lesser extent, in advanced science classes.
National Research Center for Career and Technical Education. University of Louisville, College of Education and Human Development, Louisville, KY 40292. Tel: 877-372-2283; Tel: 502-852-4727; Fax: 502-852-3308; e-mail: nrccte@louisville.edu Web site: http://www.nrccte.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED)
Authoring Institution: National Research Center for Career and Technical Education
Grant or Contract Numbers: VO51A070003