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ERIC Number: ED568590
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 230
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-7205-1
ISSN: N/A
A Study of the Efficacy of an Integrated Nutrition Assessment, Interviewing and Counseling, and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Course Utilizing Problem-Based Learning
Stanczyk, Kathy K.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
Dietetics graduates have been argued to enter supervised professional practice, or a Dietetic Internship, with deficient clinical reasoning skills. Some researchers have suggested that one factor contributing to deficient clinical reasoning skills has been the fragmented course sequencing of a traditional dietetics curriculum, with multiple courses that address essential skills separated by as many as a few semesters. Utilizing problem-based learning (PBL) in an integrated skills course at the end of baccalaureate training is an alternative curricular strategy; however, quantitative and qualitative data demonstrating efficacy of such an alternative curriculum approach is lacking. An objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was used in the current study to assess the clinical reasoning skills of students who completed an integrated skills course, and their OSCE scores were compared to that of a control group. Students in the treatment group demonstrated better clinical reasoning skills than students in the control group; however, not all results were statistically significant. The ability to achieve statistical significance was limited by the small sample size; therefore, future research needs to utilize larger samples. Incorporation of an integrated skills course in a dietetics curriculum potentially offers numerous benefits. In addition to the apparent improvement in clinical reasoning skills, use of PBL in an integrated skills course might improve students' confidence level as they transition from academia to supervised professional practice. Further, by condensing the number of courses in the dietetics curriculum, students may be able to take an upper division elective course, allowing for exploration of a field that aligns with dietetics and/or students' professional goals. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A