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ERIC Number: ED568418
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 161
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-5607-5
ISSN: N/A
From ELD Curriculum Guide to Practice: A Case Study of Teachers Negotiating How and What to Teach
Nunez, Raquel Mendia
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, The Claremont Graduate University
English language learners (ELs) face multiple challenges in receiving proper instruction that balances their need for English Language Development (ELD) and grade-level content instruction. Additionally, educators often minimize the importance of recognizing students' funds of knowledge as a valuable asset they bring to the classroom. Studies that assess teachers' pedagogy in the ELD block are missing in the literature. This qualitative case study analyzes how two teachers in a Northern California elementary school with varying years of experience negotiate the day-to-day implementation of their district-adopted ELD curriculum. Each day teachers at the site "switch" students for 45 minutes to ensure that ELs receive dedicated ELD instruction at their assessed English proficiency levels. The ELD curriculum adopted by the district is comprehensive and provides teachers with detailed daily lessons. Findings of this study demonstrate that while "teachers" are expected to follow the curriculum, it was documented that the teachers had autonomy in deciding how to deliver their daily instruction and made significant lesson modifications. Secondly, it was found that there were no "district"- or "school-level" systems in place to assess the effectiveness of the ELD curriculum or allow for teacher collaboration. Despite research emphasizing the importance of building relationships with students and honoring what they bring to the classroom, it was found that they often do not teachers did not recognize nor use the students' "funds of knowledge" to strengthen their learning experiences in ELD. Implications for research, theory and practice are also discussed. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: California