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ERIC Number: ED567572
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 323
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-3294-9
ISSN: N/A
Framing Innovation: Does an Instructional Vision Help Superintendents Gain Acceptance for a Large-Scale Technology Initiative?
Flanagan, Gina E.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Boston College
There is limited research that outlines how a superintendent's instructional vision can help to gain acceptance of a large-scale technology initiative. This study explored how superintendents gain acceptance for a large-scale technology initiative (specifically a 1:1 device program) through various leadership actions. The role of the instructional vision in helping superintendents gain acceptance for a technology initiative was the focus of this research. Five school districts where a large-scale, 1:1 technology initiative was being implemented were the location for this study. These superintendents as well as district administrators with key roles in the technology initiative were interviewed to explore their knowledge and perceptions regarding the district's instructional vision and how it was being utilized to gain acceptance for the technology initiative. The study found that the superintendents utilized various strategic processes to create resonance with stakeholders between the instructional vision and the technology initiative. The superintendents utilized instructional visions that contained many elements of constructivist and 21st century learning skills. However, the definition and communication of the superintendent's specific instructional vision was not always clear and consistent throughout the district. The mission statements, technology plans and district administrators often communicated an instructional vision for the district that was unrelated to the instructional vision communicated by the superintendent. Additionally, while the implementation of the instructional vision was described as a collaborative effort in all of the districts, the development of the instructional vision was primarily limited to the superintendent and his leadership team (principals and central office academic administrators). Study results showed that while there was an understanding amongst district administrators of how technology can support teaching and learning, there was inconsistency in the understanding of the superintendent's instructional vision for the district and how technology should be utilized to help accomplish these goals. Often, it would appear that the technology initiative was driving the instructional vision for the districts and not the other way around. Since there is limited research that outlines how a superintendent's instructional vision can help to gain acceptance of a large-scale technology initiative, this study hopes to highlight the use of the instructional vision in gaining acceptance of a large-scale technology initiative and the practical methods of achieving this. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A