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ERIC Number: ED567430
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 171
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-0902-6
ISSN: N/A
Community-Based Instruction and Differences in Functional Independence of Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Johnson, Temperance L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Walden University
Students with significant developmental disabilities who engage in activities outside the classroom appear to have better post-school outcomes in the areas of employability, living skills, and independence. No research has examined whether functional independence was significantly different in graduates with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who have and have not participated in community-based instruction (CBI) programs; however, because this information can support the outcomes of adults with ASD, this study used a quantitative post-test only, non-equivalent groups design to investigate the differences in functional independence between two groups of high school graduates with ASD and differentiated by CBI experience. As suggested in Kolb's experiential learning theory, tangible experiences, like CBI, help students make connections to the world beyond the classroom. Thus, the CBI group was expected to demonstrate greater functional independence, which was assessed by having caregivers complete an online demographic questionnaire and a mailed protocol of the Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised. The study drew on 134 participants, and an analysis of covariance was used to adjust for intellectual disability. The results showed a modest statistically significant difference in support scores between the two groups. However, the non-CBI group in this study functioned higher with less support needed. The findings demonstrate that attributes of specific programs serving individuals with ASD should be assessed to ensure that they produce positive post-school outcomes. This finding will significantly inform legislative, educational, and vocational decision-makers involved in these programs, promoting positive social change. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Scales of Independent Behavior