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ERIC Number: ED567417
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 124
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-0045-0
ISSN: N/A
Examining the Impact of a Positive Behavior Support Program and Direct Instruction of Social and Emotional Learning Skills on the Externalizing Behaviors of Disruptive Youth
Jones, Darla Renee
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Drexel University
Many adolescent disruptive youth in Pennsylvania are removed from traditional school settings for externalizing behaviors including aggression, defying authority, poor relationships with peers and adults, disruptive behaviors, and bullying. Post-school outcomes of adolescent disruptive youth remain dismal, and these students are the most represented in the juvenile justice system. Without intensive interventions, they experience negative outcomes including impaired social relationships, higher drop out rates, increased disciplinary contacts, unemployment, and auto accidents. The lack of social and emotional learning skills in the areas of self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making contribute to externalizing behaviors of adolescent disruptive youth. Risk factors and protective factors also impact the likelihood that a given behavior will occur or a desired outcome will be achieved. Positive behavior support has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for impacting externalizing behaviors. The study examined the impact of a CHAMP model of positive behavior support and the direct instruction of three core social and emotional skill competencies in the areas of self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making skills on externalizing behaviors of disruptive youth. The Ripple Effects Whole Spectrum Intervention System® was utilized to teach social and emotional learning skills including risk and protective factors. Eleven male and female students between the ages of thirteen and eighteen placed in a central PA alternative school participated in the study. Quantitative data included behavioral observations in the areas of conversations, healthy interactions, active engagement, movement in the building/classroom, and personal responsibility, referred to as the CHAMP model. Reasons for teacher initiated removals from the instructional environment for externalizing behaviors were also collected and analyzed. Qualitative data including teacher, counselor, and site manager interviews were collected to determine staff perceptions of the efficacy of the program and any recommendations for improvement. The results of this study indicated that overall, the CHAMP model of positive behavior support and direct instruction of social and emotional learning skills did not positively impact the externalizing behaviors of disruptive youth. Staff perceptions of the efficacy of the program and recommendations for improvement revealed that staff members reported the belief that the CHAMP model of positive behavior support and the direct instruction of social and emotional skills via a computer-based program was effective at reducing the externalizing behaviors of disruptive youth in the program setting. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Pennsylvania