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ERIC Number: ED567384
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 148
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3038-0842-5
ISSN: N/A
The State of Practice in Educational Delivery Systems for Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Rural Setting
Hefter, Jennifer
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
Globally, two current educational problems for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exist. Many teachers lack training in evidence-based practices (EBP) and in-service teachers are not transferring theory to practice. This study was locally conducted to establish the state of the EBP delivery systems, with a specific focus on rural settings. Grounded in behavioral and constructivist theories, the purposes of this non-experimental mixed-methods concurrent study were to examine the current state of the practice on EBP with students with ASD in North Dakota and to study the extent of theory to practice transfer with reflections and interviews. The quantitative data were collected with a researcher-designed survey of 228 case managers and teachers statewide. The sample came from 6 regions of North Dakota. The qualitative phase included reflections and interviews of 5 practicum students from a masters program to understand the extent of theory-to-practice transfer. Findings indicated that the survey results from the rural setting contradicted global studies and that North Dakota teachers used EBP with students with ASD. In-service practicum students transferred theory to practice into practical settings at a high level. Summatively, what teachers are actually doing, is aligned with what they are being taught. In addition, delivery systems were derived from applied behavior analysis foundations, which has been an established EBP. The results of this study will contribute to positive social change by showing stakeholders the state of the practice of delivery systems for students with ASD. They will then in-turn develop relevant state guidelines for best practices. The study could be effectively replicated by other rural university programs for the assessment of curriculum. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: North Dakota