NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED567329
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 176
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3037-8814-7
ISSN: N/A
Technological Challenges of Faculty at a Historically Black College and University
Allen, Nedra R.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
Technology integration (TI) in many classrooms has been hindered because of limited technology usage, which has caused a void between instructors communicating with and educating students. The purpose of this case study was to address the problem of TI in the classroom setting at a small Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Arkansas by uncovering ways to motivate faculty to use technology in the classroom while identifying barriers to effective TI by faculty. The theoretical framework which guided the study was Rogers's Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Faculty members who are comfortable using more technology in the classroom will better prepare students for the global society, where technology drives many careers. The research question explored faculty members' limited use of technology in the HBCU classroom setting. Eleven participants were selected from faculty in 4 departments on campus. Data were obtained through face-to-face interviews and then transcribed, themed, and coded using Microsoft Excel. Findings indicated that faculty members lacked the technological training needed to increase their support for TI in the classroom setting. Participants used technology only at a lower level as PowerPoint presentations, videos, Comprehensive Academic Management System, and the Internet. As a result of this study, a faculty development workshop was created. This study contributes to positive social change at this HBCU and other institutions of higher education by identifying limitations to using technology, thus enabling researchers to identify the factors that will motivate faculty to use more technology in the classroom. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Arkansas