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ERIC Number: ED566583
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: 223
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3394-6989-8
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Graphing, Goal Setting, and Conferencing on Reading and Math Achievement
Snyder, Amy T.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Capella University
Improving foundational academic skills for elementary level students continues to be a challenge for classroom teachers. This study implemented weekly progress monitoring procedures using curriculum-based measurement assessments in conjunction with weekly individual student-teacher graphing and goal-setting conferences to determine the effect the procedures would have on students' reading accuracy, reading fluency, and math computation skill levels. A quasi-experimental mixed-methods research design using mixed purposeful convenience sampling with pre- and post-testing was selected and executed for this nine-week action research study. The target population consisted of seven third-grade students and six fourth-grade students for a total of thirteen students. The quantitative data was drawn from the pre-and posttests with weekly progress monitoring assessments. The qualitative data was taken from notes documented by teachers during the weekly individual student-teacher conferences and end-of study student-teacher interviews. Additional qualitative data was collected by the researcher during weekly and end-of study individual researcher-teacher interviews. The qualitative data was analyzed using a researcher-coded method and MAXQDA 11 data analysis software. The results revealed that the fourth-grade students demonstrated higher gains in reading fluency and math computation than the third-grade students. The inclusion of teaching points during the students' individual weekly student-teacher conferences may be a contributing factor to this higher rate of improvement of skills. Students in both grades indicated a strong preference for the goal-setting and conferencing procedures which may reflect the influence of the increased level of personal interactions. Both teachers noted an increase in students' motivation as a result of the study's procedures. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Grade 3; Primary Education; Early Childhood Education; Grade 4; Intermediate Grades
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A