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ERIC Number: ED566013
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 124
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3037-1322-4
ISSN: N/A
The Use of Technology in the Medical Assisting Classroom
Kozielski, Tracy L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
The growing presence of technology in health care has infiltrated educational institutions. Numerous software and hardware technologies have been designed to improve student learning; however, their use in the classroom is unclear. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the experiences of medical assisting faculty using technology in the classroom. Medical assisting is one of the fastest growing allied health professions. Constructivism and adult learning theory provided a framework for this research. These theories support the concepts of active learning and real-life learning opportunities, which when implemented correctly, technology can provide. The overarching research question, supported by three subquestions, was designed to reveal the experiences of medical assisting faculty using technology to enhance student learning in a vocational college classroom. The research was conducted at 2 campus locations of a 7-campus vocational college system. Both part-time and full-time medical assisting faculty were interviewed and observed teaching in their classrooms. The interview and observation data were evaluated and coded. Four predominate themes materialized from the data indicating that the instructors' valued technology. Furthermore, some form of technology was visible in each classroom and was being used in the majority of the classrooms observed. Student engagement was evident in the classrooms that were utilizing technology. The results indicate the need for further faculty development in technology, which could be further examined in future research. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Adult Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A