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ERIC Number: ED564939
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 72
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3036-5956-0
ISSN: N/A
Comparing Looping Teacher-Assigned and Traditional Teacher-Assigned Student Achievement Scores
Lloyd, Melissa C.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
A problem in many elementary schools is determining which teacher assignment strategy best promotes the academic progress of students. To find and implement educational practices that address the academic needs of all learners, schools need research-based data focusing on the 2 teacher assignment strategies: looping assignment (LA) and traditional assignment (TA). LA is defined as a student remaining with the same teacher for more than 1 sequential year, and TA refers to a student being assigned to a new teacher every year. This study is important to educators for determining if one type of teacher assignment increases the academic performance of students to a higher degree than the other. The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare the achievement scores of students experiencing LA with students experiencing TA. Archived data for 235 students from the Measures of Academic Progress were used in order to conduct the independent sample t test. From this sample, 111 students looped and 124 students did not loop. Both groups were heterogeneously formed in order to maintain balance based on race, gender, and exceptionality. The results from this study were non-significant and did not support that students experiencing LA outperformed their TA counterparts academically. The consistency between the mean scores may have been due to resources or initiatives used in classrooms where teachers are expected to use the same curriculum. One recommendation for future study is to isolate the differing instructional strategies and resources used in these classrooms in order to determine if they affect student achievement. With this information, educational stakeholders may begin to view LA classrooms as a viable instructional tool that supports academic achievement to the same extent as TA classrooms. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A