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ERIC Number: ED564563
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 161
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3036-1000-4
ISSN: N/A
Using Science Inquiry Methods to Promote Self-Determination and Problem-Solving Skills for Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability
Miller, Bridget T.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Purdue University
The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of guided science inquiry methods with self-monitoring checklists to support problem-solving for students with moderate cognitive disabilities in both science and functional daily activities. The present study contributes to the literature examining guided inquiry methods as a means for student with a moderate intellectual disability to 1) gain access to the general curriculum standards and 2) build self-determination skills, and expands on the current literature by adding generalization conditions where students apply inquiry problem solving skills to functional daily applications that may benefit them directly in post school settings (Miller, 2012). The study investigates two hypotheses; "H[subscript 1]": When provided a self-monitoring checklist, students with a moderate intellectual disability enrolled in a functional curriculum will increase their level of autonomy when completing inquiry problem-solving activities linked to science content, with the null hypotheses stating, "H[subscript o]": When provided a self-monitoring checklist, students with a moderate intellectual disability enrolled in a functional curriculum will not increase their level of autonomy when completing inquiry problem-solving activities linked to science content, and H2: When provided a self-monitoring checklist, students with a moderate intellectual disability enrolled in a functional curriculum will increase their level of autonomy when presented with novel problem-solving tasks related to daily living situations, the null hypotheses stating, "H[subscript o2]": When provided with a self-monitoring checklist, students with a moderate intellectual disability enrolled in a functional curriculum not increase their level of autonomy when presented with novel problem-solving tasks related to daily living situations. The study resulted in a rejection of both null hypotheses with the need for replication studies to verify findings. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A