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ERIC Number: ED563881
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 130
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3035-9539-4
ISSN: N/A
Differences in Student Engagement of Entering Texas Community College Students
Taylor, Trevena B.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Dallas Baptist University
Improving the academic achievement of students for success in college in ways that lead to college degree attainment is a growing concern for our nation. Educators are exploring the topic of student engagement to better understand critical issues surrounding college degree attainment. Through analysis of data collected from the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE), a series of statistical tests; ANOVA, Brown-Forsythe, and independent samples t-tests, were conducted to test differences in engagement of entering Texas community college students (n = 1,000) in 2010, 2011, and 2012 based upon ethnicity, gender, high school grade point average (GPA) and whether or not a student earned college credits while in high school. The two engagement variables examined were high expectations and aspirations and engaged learning, which are two of the six benchmarks developed by the SENSE instrument. Significant differences were found in high expectations and aspirations among students based upon gender, high school GPA and college credits earned while in high school (p < 0.05). Significant differences were not found in high expectations and aspirations based upon ethnicity. Significant differences were also not found in engaged learning among students based upon ethnicity, gender, high school GPA, and college credit earned while in high school. The overall mean score for students in this study indicated high levels of expectations and aspirations (M = 0.848) on a scale of 0 to 1 regardless of ethnicity, gender, high school GPA or whether or not the student earned college credit while in high school. Although these students were involved in high expectations and aspirations, the students were similarly engaged in overall low levels of engagement in educational practices associated with engaged learning (M = 0.301) regardless of ethnicity, gender, high school GPA, or whether or not the student earned college credit while in high school. A Pearson Correlation was conducted to further explore the relationship between high expectations and aspirations and engaged learning. A significant positive relationship was found (p < 0.05) indicating that as engagement in high expectations and aspirations increased, engagement in engaged learning also increased. Based on the results of the study, the engagement of students in educationally effective learning practices is a topic that continues to be an area of concern among entering community college students. Recommendations were made for further research to explore why students are highly motivated, yet they are not highly involved in engaged learning practices. Further recommendations were made for educators at the post secondary level to engage in conversations with educators at the secondary level regarding the practices that lead to success in college and discuss how secondary level schools can help support those needs. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Two Year Colleges; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Texas