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ERIC Number: ED563758
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 204
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3035-8137-3
ISSN: N/A
Challenges of Teacher Collaboration within a Professional Learning Community
Seisay, Benson M.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
The professional learning community (PLC) is a powerful tool in education, one that is intended to reform failing schools and improve student achievement. This research gathered data to determine teacher perceptions about challenges of teacher collaboration within a PLC school. The key conceptual framework for this case study originated from work done by DuFour, DuFour, and Eaker, which provided guidelines for transforming failing schools into learning organizations for enhancement of student achievement. Interview and observation data were gathered from 4 participants and analyzed inductively to produce 6 themes about teacher collaboration: student learning, school culture, teacher collaboration, teacher isolation, PLC and teacher socialization and growth, and PLC issues. The results suggested that teachers believed in the PLC concepts for working as a unified team; however, teachers also cited lack of trust and teacher isolation practices as challenges for integrating effective strategies such as teacher modeling and peer observation in their PLC meetings. Additionally, the results demonstrated that teacher isolation practices also permeate in this school culture, further inhibiting effective teacher collaboration. These findings provide school leaders a template for developing professional development to change the school culture. The implication for social change is to generate an impetus to transfer socialization skills gained from effective teacher collaboration to the classroom, which will enhance student learning. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A