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ERIC Number: ED561611
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 115
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3034-2535-6
ISSN: N/A
Improving Reading Comprehension through Explicit Summarization Instruction
Elledge, Deborah Harding
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Cincinnati
Research over the last several decades has revealed that adolescents in the United States are leaving school with insufficient literacy skills to compete in the global marketplace. A primary contributor to poor literacy rates is poor reading comprehension. The purpose of this research was to develop and test the efficacy of a protocol for teaching summarization, a frequently used reading comprehension strategy, to fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students. Participating students wrote summaries of science textbook passages which were analyzed for the inclusion of main ideas and the deletion of extraneous details. One class at each grade level served as the experimental group and received 4 lessons of explicit summarization instruction, and one class at each grade level served as the control group (students did not receive summarization instruction). Results of repeated measures ANOVA of the within-subject factor of "Time" for experimental groups indicated that there was no significant difference between the percentage of main ideas included in the pre-assessment summaries and post-assessment summaries of students after summarization instruction. A significant difference was found among the percentage of main ideas included in the summaries of students in the three grades with sixth grade students including a higher percentage of main ideas than student in fourth or fifth grade. Results indicated a significant difference between the percentage of main ideas included in the summaries of students in the experimental group and students in the control group on the post assessment summaries with the experimental group including a significantly lower percentage of main ideas. Analysis of extraneous details revealed that the experimental group included significantly fewer details in their summaries after the summarization instruction. A significant difference was also found between conditions with students in the experimental group including significantly fewer extraneous details than students in the control group on post assessment summaries. These results suggest that the protocol was effective in teaching students to writer shorter summaries, but not in teaching them how to identify the main ideas of a textbook passage. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A