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ERIC Number: ED561256
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2015-Apr
Pages: 8
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
What Employers Need to Know: Frequently Asked Questions about High School Students in Workplaces
Jobs For the Future
Employers may not know the best way to reach out or how to structure opportunities for young people to explore careers within their organization. In addition, employers may be uncertain about liability, privacy policies, and safety regulations for employees under the age of 18. State and federal laws and policies pertaining to youth employment can be difficult to navigate. However, in most cases, laws related to working with young people do not differ significantly from those for adult employees. Increasing the number of internships and other work-based learning opportunities available to young people is essential for closing the skills gap and preparing youth for successful careers. This brief, which addresses employers' most frequently asked questions, is intended to demystify practical issues related to opening workplaces to students under 18. While there are many ways for employers to engage in work-based learning, much of the material in this brief is focused on internships. Because internships are more intensive than other forms of work-based learning, employers offering internships often need resources that address common questions. The explanations below are intended to clarify misconceptions and encourage employers to open their minds and their doors to young people. The answers to the questions in this brief are meant to serve as a starting point for employers considering internships for high school students. However, because policies and regulations vary considerably across the country, it is not possible to provide definitive answers to all questions; employers should consult their human resources departments, legal counsel, and insurers, as appropriate. Links to resources on such topics as orientation, safety, and training appear throughout this brief and at the end in a list of resources and materials. [This report was produced under the Pathways to Prosperity Network, an initiative of Jobs for the Future and the Harvard Graduate School of Education.]
Jobs for the Future. 88 Broad Street 8th Floor, Boston, MA 02110. Tel: 617-728-4446; Fax: 617-728-4857; e-mail: info@jff.org; Web site: http://www.jff.org
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Jobs for the Future; Harvard University, Graduate School of Education
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: Fair Labor Standards Act