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ERIC Number: ED560011
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013-May
Pages: 164
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 130
ISBN: 978-92-806-4656-6
ISSN: N/A
The State of the World's Children, 2013: Children with Disabilities
UNICEF
Reports such as this typically begin with a statistic designed to highlight a problem. The girls and boys to whom this edition of "The State of the World's Children" is dedicated are not problems. Rather, each is a sister, brother or friend who has a favourite dish, song or game; a daughter or son with dreams and the desire to fulfil them; a child with a disability who has the same rights as any other girl or boy. Given opportunities to flourish as others might, children with disabilities have the potential to lead fulfilling lives and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic vitality of their communities--as the personal essays in this volume attest. This edition of "The State of the World's Children" includes contributions by young people and parents who show that, when given that chance, children with disabilities are more than capable of overcoming barriers to their inclusion, of taking their rightful place as equal participants in society and of enriching the life of their communities. But for far too many children with disabilities, the opportunity to participate simply does not exist. Far too often, children with disabilities are among the last in line for resources and services, especially where these are scarce to begin with. Far too regularly, they are the objects simply of pity or, worse, discrimination and abuse. The deprivations faced by children and adolescents with disabilities are violations of their rights and the principle of equity, at the heart of which lies a concern for the dignity and rights of all children--including the most vulnerable and marginalized members of society. As this report documents, the inclusion of children with disabilities in society is possible--but it requires first a change of perception, a recognition that children with disabilities hold the same rights as others; that they can be agents of change and self-determination, not merely the beneficiaries of charity; that their voices must be heard and heeded in our policymaking and programmes. Fortunately, progress is being made--albeit unevenly. This report not only examines the challenges involved in ensuring that children with disabilities have the fair access to services that is their right. It also explores initiatives that show promise in such areas as health, nutrition, education and emergency programming--and in the data collection and analysis needed to improve policies and operations in all these fields. Other chapters also discuss principles and approaches that can be adapted to advance these children's inclusion.
UNICEF. 3 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Tel: 212-326-7000; Fax: 212-887-7465; Web site: http://www.unicef.org/education
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)