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ERIC Number: ED559538
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 286
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3033-0358-6
ISSN: N/A
The Development of Social Perspective Taking and Leadership Decision-Making in City Government Managers
Van Rossum, Zachary Johannes
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Teachers College, Columbia University
I examined the role of social perspective taking in leadership decision-making by investigating how a group of 70 leaders made sense of a hypothetical workplace dilemma in order to understand how they used their capacity for social perspective taking as part of their decision-making process. The majority of these leaders work in North America, are Caucasian, speak English as their primary language, are between 20-60 years old and are mid-level managers working for a large city government. My purpose was to understand how these leaders incorporated social perspective taking into their decision-making process, and what this process looked like at three different levels of psychological development, as measured by the Lectical Assessment System. Data I analyzed were short essays written by this group of leaders in response to a dilemma as part of an online assessment. My inquiry was guided by two research questions: 1) How, if at all, does this group of leaders use social perspective taking as part of their decision-making process, and 2) what are the similarities within and differences across three levels of psychological development? I employed an educational research methodology, developmental maieutics, which enabled me to describe the sequence of psychological development around social perspective taking and decision-making. Findings from my first research question suggest that: a) these leaders did use social perspective taking as part of their decision-making process; b) this involved three distinct processes 1) perspective taking, 2) perspective seeking, and 3) decision-making; c) these three processes included a total of twelve themes. Findings from my second research question suggest that: a) there are important similarities within and differences across three levels of psychological development; b) these similarities and differences can be organized according to these three processes and twelve themes; and c) variances across developmental levels can be viewed both in terms of 1) the deeper structure of how these leaders described their social perspective taking and decision-making process and 2) the content of what these leaders discussed in their essays. Based on these findings I make several recommendations for how educators might shape learning initiatives to better support leaders in developing their capacity for social perspective taking and decision-making. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Adult Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: North America