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ERIC Number: ED558868
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 203
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3032-7733-7
ISSN: N/A
Student Retention: Helping Underprepared Students Succeed at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
Lee, Melinda L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
Higher education institutions have been challenged with retaining students until graduation over the past forty years. The greatest attrition occurs during the freshman-to-sophomore year. College administrators must evaluate data trends to determine the academic needs of enrolled students so effective programming can be developed and executed to enhance the overall college experience for all students. This quantitative study determined the effects of developmental education courses on first-time full-time degree-seeking freshman mid-year and freshman-to-sophomore year retention. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine if the students' pre-college academic background, participation in a developmental education course, ethnicity, gender, freshman mid-year and freshman-to-sophomore year retention for the fall 2003 to fall 2007 freshman cohort. This study consisted of 5,038 students. It was found that students that participated in at least one developmental education course are less likely to be retained to mid-year and the freshman-to-sophomore year. Caucasian students were the highest ethnic group enrolled in at least one developmental education course. African American students were the highest ethnic group enrolled in an English, math, and both developmental education courses. Caucasian students were the second highest ethnic group enrolled in an English developmental education course. Hispanics were the second ethnic group enrolled in a math developmental education course and both developmental education courses. Females were the highest gender reported to be enrolled in a math and both developmental education course. Male students represented the highest gender enrolled in an English developmental education course. Furthermore, it was found that there was not a significant difference in retaining students based on their ethnicity and gender. Overall, students that did not participate in a developmental education course were more likely to be retained at mid-year and from the freshman-to-sophomore year. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: North Carolina