NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED557680
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 94
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3039-8342-9
ISSN: N/A
Stress Levels in Tenure-Track and Recently Tenured Faculty Members in Selected Institutions of Higher Education in Northeast Tennessee
Carr, Amanda R.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, East Tennessee State University
The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare the stress, strain, and coping levels between pretenured faculty and recently tenured faculty in institutions of higher education in Northeast Tennessee. Aging faculty population combined with talented people leaving the area is common in rural parts of the United States. There is a need to better understand the occupational factors within the faculty roles in order to better recruit and retain faculty in this region. Four different institutions of higher education in Northeast Tennessee, producing 92 responses, participated in this study. The Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised (Osipow, 1998) was used to measure occupational stress, psychological strain, and coping resources. With regards to one Strain (PSQ) variable, Physical Strain (PHS), those up for tenure in 2016 had a significantly higher mean of Physical Strain than those tenured in 2011. This implies that those up for tenure in 2016 may report more frequent worries about their health and physical symptoms. The data also indicated that there was significance in the Recreation scores of those who were tenured and the Recreation scores of those who have not yet received tenure. In regards to one Coping (PRQ) variable, Recreation (RE), those up for tenure in 2016 had a significantly lower mean than those tenured in 2011. This implies that those tenured in 2011 take more advantage of recreational or leisure time. The data indicated that there was a significant difference in Strain (PSQ) levels according to age groups. The data also indicated that there was a significant difference between Coping (PRQ) levels according to age group. Post Hoc tests were not performed as at least 1 age group had fewer than 2 cases. The variables with the highest means were components of the Stress (ORQ) scale. Role Overload (RO) had the highest mean of 31.92. Those scoring high on this scale may describe their work load as increasing or unsupported by needed resources. Responsibility (R) had the next highest with 26.26. Those scoring high in this area may report high levels of responsibility for subordinates. Interpersonal Strain (IS), a component of the Strain (PSQ) scale, had a mean of 20.92. High scorers may report quarrels or excessive dependency on loved ones. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Tennessee