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ERIC Number: ED557561
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 124
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3211-7883-8
ISSN: N/A
Factors Predicting READ 180 18-Week Grades among Middle School Students: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Ethnicity, Reading and Language Skills and Socioeconomic Indicators
Brown, Rhonda M.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, TUI University
Middle school students who struggle in reading are likely to also experience difficulty in their other subjects in school. A variety of reading intervention programs exist for schools to utilize to increase reading comprehension. The Scholastic READ 180 program is used as part of this study. This small, focused study of 160 students examined the factors predicting READ 180 18-week grades among middle school students with regard to the role of self-efficacy and other key variables. Data was analyzed and several variables were identified as statistically significant predictors of program success (as measured by READ 180 18-week grades): language arts 6-week grade check, self-efficacy (MSLQ), and free/reduced lunch. The overall multiple regression model was found to be statistically significant, with an adjusted R[superscript 2] of 0.334, thus indicating that the combination of independent variables in the model explains about 33% of the change in the dependent variable of READ 180 18 week grade checks. Implications of these findings are the importance of student self-efficacy and student achievement in language arts (measured via six week grades) for their academic reading success. A major finding of this study is that READ 180 appears to be an effective reading intervention program. Programs and services that can build students' sense of self-efficacy will likely also improve their academic performance in reading. Extra attention and/or services may be needed for those students receiving free/reduced lunch. Future research will be needed to examine this last finding, as it may be a proxy for socioeconomic status. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A