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ERIC Number: ED557428
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 129
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3211-3162-8
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Inclusion Models on Special Education Student Performance in Charter Schools in Washington, D.C.
Owoh, Kendahl
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Phoenix
Assessment results of 52 special education students in a charter school in Washington, D.C., were used to compare instruction received in co-teaching models of inclusion and resource classrooms to determine their impact on end-of-year standardized state exams. Statistical analysis showed Grade 3-8 special education students currently receiving instruction in a co-teaching model of inclusion scored significantly higher in state mathematics assessments than special education students currently receiving instruction in a resource classroom. There was no significant difference in state reading assessment performance among Grade 3-8 special education students currently receiving instruction in a co-teaching model of inclusion or receiving their instruction in a resource classroom. Assessment scores were grouped by levels of proficiency. The levels for the sample population included below basic and basic or proficient. The results showed there was no significant association between service setting and math level of proficiency. However, there was a significant association between the reading level of proficiency and service setting. Forty-six percent of students who received instruction in the co-teaching model of inclusion had below basic reading scores. This compares with 73.1% of students who received instruction through the resource model of inclusion who were below basic. Conversely, 53.8% of students who received instruction in the co-teaching model of inclusion had basic or proficient reading scores. This compares with 26.9% of students who received instruction through the resource model of inclusion. School districts may be able to use this information to design inclusion teacher training to better explain the successes and failures of different models of inclusion. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: District of Columbia