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ERIC Number: ED556836
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014
Pages: 182
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3037-7735-6
ISSN: N/A
Perceptions of Educators Regarding Direct Social Skills Instruction for Students with Disabilities
Kok, Amor
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Northcentral University
As mandated by state and federal laws, students with disabilities have been mainstreamed into a general educational setting. The problem was these students exhibited behavior that interfered with their learning or the learning of other students. The perception of educators and administrators regarding social skills instruction for students with disabilities in the Fayette County Schools was the focus of this qualitative study. Six schools, which included three middle school settings and three high school settings, were studied as separate cases with four participants per school and a sum total of 24 participants. Participant population included one social skills teacher, one administrator, one school counselor, one exceptional children's services consultant, and one special education department head. Data was collected through face to face interviews, recorded through the use of an iPad, and downloaded in the data analysis program of NVivo9. Results indicated that social skills instruction influenced behavior, interpersonal relationships, participation in the general education setting, and the academic performance of students with disabilities. Teachers, consultants, Local Education Agencies (LEA), which are the department heads of special education, and counselors, could continue to develop a full awareness of how social skills training have an influence on behavior, general education participation, and interpersonal relationships. It became clear that there were factors that posed barriers in implementing a successful social skills training program. Contributing factors were support from educators in the school building, from parents and community members, and support from administrators. The most important factors that could hinder effective implementation of the program are; eligibility category, class size, consistency and number of sessions per week. Further research could explore how social skills competence influences academic performance and student transition to post-secondary options. Research of parent and student perceptions on social skills training could be investigated. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools; High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A