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ERIC Number: ED556100
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 195
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3035-4476-7
ISSN: N/A
Mentoring Functions and Job Satisfaction of Community College Leaders
Kennedy, Shannon L.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, North Carolina State University
The purpose of the study was to examine the mentoring functions of career support and psychosocial support and perceived levels of overall job satisfaction of executive-level community college administrators employed by community colleges in the nine mega-states. This research can guide future research on mentoring functions and job satisfaction of executive-level community college administrators and guide practical implementation of mentoring programs in community colleges. Theoretical support for this research was Lent, Brown, and Hackett's (1994) Social Cognitive Career Theory. The survey instrument used for this research included demographic questions, the Mentoring Functions Scale (Noe, 1988), and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form (Weiss, Dawis, England, & Lofquist, 1967). Seven research questions guided the study: 1) How do community college executive-level administrators from the nine mega-states that have been informally or formally mentored perceive job satisfaction, as measured by the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire? 2) How do community college executive-level administrators from the nine mega-states that have been informally or formally mentored perceive mentoring functions of career support and psychosocial support, as measured by Noe's (1988) Mentoring Functions Scale? 3) Are there relationships between career support and demographic variables of executive-level community college administrators? 4) Are there relationships between psychosocial support and demographic variables of executive-level community college administrators? 5) Are there relationships between overall job satisfaction and demographic variables of executive-level community college administrators that have been informally or formally mentored? 6) Are there relationships between the mentoring functions of career support and psychosocial support and overall job satisfaction of executive-level community college administrators that have been informally or formally mentored? 7) Do mentoring functions and demographic variables explain a significant amount of variance in job satisfaction? The research method used was a non-experimental survey design. A random proportional cluster sample of executive-level community college administrators selected from the nine mega-states was used for the study. The Mentoring Functions Scale and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire were used in the web-based survey to collect data. Data were collected over a three-week span yielding a total of 262 responses giving a 34.1% response rate. Findings indicated that executive-level community college administrators that have been informally or formally mentored are satisfied with their jobs. Further, participants reported perceived levels of both career support and psychosocial support. The level of career support, however, was higher. Correlations indicated that there is no relationship between the mentoring function of career support or psychosocial support and gender of protege, gender of mentor, or type of mentoring relationship. Correlations also indicated proteges received more career support and psychosocial support in formal mentoring relationships than in informal mentoring relationships. Correlations revealed more female proteges received psychosocial support than male proteges and those in a formal mentoring relationship may have higher levels of overall job satisfaction than those proteges in an informal mentoring relationship. Overall, job satisfaction had no significant relationships with the demographic variables. However, as career support and psychosocial support mentoring functions increased, overall job satisfaction increased. A regression showed that career support could be used to explain 53.1% of the variance of overall job satisfaction. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire