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ERIC Number: ED555905
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 256
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3035-2647-3
ISSN: N/A
Differences in Hispanic Access and Success Rates for Health-Related Studies in Texas Health-Related Institutions: A Multiyear, Statewide Investigation
Cox, Shelley M.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Sam Houston State University
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Hispanic student access and success in health-related degrees by examining enrollment and graduation rates over a period of 13 years. Archival data were obtained from the THECB consisting of the number of Hispanic students enrolled and number of degrees awarded in the health-related degrees at Texas health-related institutions for each year beginning with 2000 through 2012. The health-related degrees for which data were available included certificate, undergraduate, masters, doctoral, medical, dental, and nursing. Methodology: For this study, a non-experimental, causal-comparative, quantitative research design was used to investigate Hispanic student access and success in health-related degrees at Texas health-related institutions from the fall of 2000 through the fall of 2012. Archived data obtained from the Texas Higher Education Accountability System for the nine designated health-related institutions were used to analyze six research questions. Findings: Statistically significant increases were present in the number of Hispanic students enrolled in master, doctoral, and medical degrees. However, for the percentage of Hispanic students enrolled in health-related degrees, the only statistically significant increases were present for dental degree programs. Statistically significant increases were present in both the number and percentage of Hispanic students awarded health-related master degrees. The trend in the number of Hispanic students enrolled in health-related programs across the 13 years of data was overall increases in each area with fluctuations; whereas the trend in the percentage of health-related degrees awarded to Hispanic students over the 13 years of data was relatively flat. Results were consistent with the literature in that Hispanic students are underrepresented in the health professions. Although Hispanic enrollment and degree attainment are increasing in general, the increases are not enough to attain the goals set for Closing the Gaps 2015 initiative. The lack of significant increases over the 13 year period during which attention has been directed to increasing Hispanic success should serve as an impetus to examine the overall system. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Texas