NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED555503
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 90
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3034-4722-8
ISSN: N/A
The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs
Koumoullos, Michael
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, St. John's University (New York), School of Education and Human Services
This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these students was compared to a group of students who were members of school based sports teams and to a group of students who were not part of either of the first two groups. Academic record was defined as overall GPA, English grade, mathematics grade, mathematics-based standardized state exam scores, and attendance rates. All of the participants of this study were students in a large, urban career and technical education high school. As STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) has come to the forefront of educational focus, robotics programs have grown in quantity. Starting robotics programs requires a serious commitment of time, money, and other resources. The benefits of such programs have not been well analyzed. This research study had three major goals: to identify the academic characteristics of students who are drawn to robotics programs, to identify the academic impact of the robotics program during the robotics season, and to identify the academic impact of the robotics program at the end of the school year. The study was a non-experiment. The researchers ran MANOVS, repeated measures analyses, an ANOVA, and descriptive statistics to analyze the data. The data showed that students drawn to robotics were academically stronger than students who did not participate in robotics. The data also showed that grades and attendance did not significantly improve or degrade either during the robotics season or at year-end. These findings are significant because they show that robotics programs attract students who are academically strong. This information can be very useful in high school articulation programs. These findings also show that robotics programs can be an educational activity for academically strong students. Further, they show that participation in such programs does not distract students from their academic focus. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A