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ERIC Number: ED555101
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 177
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3033-1552-7
ISSN: N/A
Non-Cognitive Factor Relationships to Hybrid Doctoral Course Satisfaction and Self-Efficacy
Egbert, Jessica Dalby
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, TUI University
Through a quantitative, non-experimental design, the studied explored non-cognitive factor relationships to hybrid doctoral course satisfaction and self-efficacy, including the differences between the online and on-campus components of the student-selected hybrid courses. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistical analyses were used to analyze survey data from 139 doctoral students in healthcare fields, including both clinical and research-based doctorates. The results reveal four key findings. First, the doctoral student experiences significantly differ between the online and on-campus components of a hybrid course for factors including task value (Wilks' Lambda = 0.97, F (1, 130) = 3.93, p = 0.05) and faculty and peer support (Wilks' Lambda = 0.97, F (1, 130) = 4.11, p = 0.05). On-campus task value was perceived significantly higher than online task value. Similarly, on-campus faculty and peer support was perceived significantly higher than online faculty and peer support. Secondly, both online and on-campus student experiences with task value (r[subscript p] (139) = 0.59, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = 0.60, p < 0.001 (on-campus)), faculty and peer support (r[subscript p] (139) = 0.39, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = 0.46, p < 0.001 (on-campus)), and boredom and frustration (r[subscript p] (139) = -0.66, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = -0.56, p < 0.001 (on-campus)) were correlated with course satisfaction. The correlations between task value and faculty and peer support were positive, whereby increased perceptions of task value and faculty and peer support correlate with increased course satisfaction. However, the correlation with boredom and frustration was negative, whereby increased boredom and frustration correlates with decreased course satisfaction. Online task value (ß = 0.25, p = 0.004), online boredom and frustration (ß = -0.30, p < 0.001), and on-campus boredom and frustration (ß = -0.23, p = 0.01), predict course satisfaction. Thirdly, both online and on-campus experiences with task value (r[subscript p] (139) = 0.50, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = 0.48, p < 0.001 (on-campus)), faculty and peer support (r[subscript p] (139) = 0.37, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = 0.38, p < 0.001 (on-campus)), and boredom and frustration (r[subscript p] (139) = -0.40, p < 0.001 (online), r[subscript p] (139) = -0.33, p < 0.001 (on-campus)) were correlated with self-efficacy. Regardless of whether online or on-campus, when students experienced high levels of either task value or faculty and peer support, self-efficacy increased. However, when students experienced high levels of online or on-campus boredom and frustration, self-efficacy decreased. Of all the variables, only online task value predicted self-efficacy (ß = 0.28, p = 0.01). Finally, the fourth key results indicated course satisfaction and self-efficacy were positively correlated, r[subscript p] (139) = 0.55, p < 0.001, and positively predict one another (ß = 0.50, p < 0.001 for course satisfaction predicting self-efficacy; ß = 0.47, p < 0.001 for self-efficacy predicting course satisfaction). By understanding the relationships between non-cognitive factors in hybrid doctoral courses, academic administrators and faculty would become more informed regarding initiatives that may improve hybrid doctoral education, retention, institutional effectiveness, and institutional success. Bandura's social cognitive theory provided the theoretical foundation for this study and limitations included the single institution and use of a convenience sample. Future recommendations to expand the study include improving reliability, increasing quantity of participants, establishing a baseline for self-efficacy, and completing additional statistical analyses. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A