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ERIC Number: ED555008
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 128
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3031-7735-4
ISSN: N/A
Stimulating Autonomous Learning Environments: Considering Group Efficacy as Mediating the Relationship between Perceived Autonomy Support and Self- Determinism in the Learning Environment
Hogan, Shannon L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Regent University
This study researched 120 college students and professors to test the mediation of group efficacy between perceived autonomy support and self-determinism. The study provided surveys to students in eight different classes. Studying multiple classes offered an opportunity to understand the model more effectively and in a broader scope. The classes studied came from both the humanities and a religious framework. The students and professors took the surveys twice during the semester, during the second week of class and the eighth week of class. This study considered a mediating variable to influence the relationship between perceived autonomy support and self-determinism. Group efficacy was hypothesized to mediate this relationship. Because group efficacy takes time to develop, this study ended up as a minilongitudinal, exploratory study. The results of the study provided validation that group efficacy does not mediate the relationship between perceived autonomy support and self-determinism. However, the study showed there was influence between (a) perceived autonomy support and group efficacy and (b) group efficacy and self-determinism. This provided much discussion. The results assist in understanding learning from a collective nature, which is contrary to Western culture. Future research and discussion of groups as being a stimulating method for learning is necessary to expand this research. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A