NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED554783
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 304
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-4712-1
ISSN: N/A
A Qualitative Case Study Exploring Best Practices for Accommodating Students with Written Expressive Disorders
Samuels, Cecelia
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Northcentral University
A qualitative case study was conducted to explore best practices for accommodating elementary, middle, and high school students with written expressive disorders. Students with disorders of written expression experience significant impairments in writing for their age, intelligence, and educational experience. Accommodations are crucial interventions for students with written expressive disorders; however, they are most effective in meeting the disability-based needs of students when empirically based practices are applied to their selection, monitoring, and assessment. Interviewing was used to explore special education teachers' perspectives about best practices for improving three phases of the accommodation process for students with written expressive disorders: selection, monitoring, and assessment. Ten special education case-managers and 10 English inclusion teachers served as participants for the study. Participants indicated that six major areas were significant to improving accommodation selection for students with written expressive disorders: (a) collaboration among parents, educational administrators, teachers, school psychologists, students, and other school systems; (b) expert knowledge and specialized training in disability-based needs of students with written expressive disorders; (c) resources; (d) technology; (e) data collection and review; and (f) alignment of accommodations with student's , profile and curriculum demands. Participants also suggested that accommodation monitoring for students with written expressive disorders may be enhanced when educators make accurate determinations about who and when to monitor using well-designed accommodation monitoring instruments such as interviews, questionnaires, and observations combined with event recording and anecdotal records. Participants further mentioned that instructional and testing settings present ideal contexts and conditions for monitoring accommodations for students with written expressive disorders. Participants reinforced that accommodation assessment for students with written expressive disorders may be improved by focusing on crucial areas such as (a) the extent to which accommodations allow students to demonstrate knowledge during instruction and testing, reduce the impact of the writing disability, and address writing deficits; and (b) students' accessibility to accommodations. Participants added that these areas of focus should be combined with extensive teacher and student feedback. Service providers such as school administrators, school psychologists, and teachers need to work collaboratively to develop well-planned programs and strategies for enhancing the accommodation process for students with written expressive disorders. Future studies should focus on larger sample sizes, and researchers may consider including regular education teachers and students with written expressive disorders. Future studies to improve writing accommodations may also be done to explore the significance of collaboration, parental input, support systems, teacher skills, writing portfolios, and the writing process for students with written expressive disorders. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A