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ERIC Number: ED553688
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Nov
Pages: 7
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
School Stability: Improving Academic Achievement for NJ Foster Children. Policy Brief
Bernard-Rance, Kourtney; Parello, Nancy
Advocates for Children of New Jersey
Children in New Jersey's foster care system are more likely to remain in their home school when they enter foster care, thanks to a law passed in 2010, giving these fragile children improved educational stability. The law allows children to remain in their "school of origin" when they are placed in foster care, even if the foster home is in a different town. Prior to 2010, New Jersey's school residency laws prohibited that from happening. The intent was to minimize the disruption foster children experience, giving them the continuity of remaining in a familiar school with friends, teachers and other school staff they know. Foster youth, in general, struggle more in school than other children. Having educational stability can help improve their academic success. Advocates for Children of New Jersey (ACNJ) conducted a survey of child welfare stakeholders to learn how the implementation of the law was affecting children. The survey found that most respondents believed that the law has helped reduce school disruptions for children in placement and has benefitted children's academic performance, physical and mental health, and relations with friends. The foster home's distance from the child's original school was the most common reason cited why children changed schools. Most survey respondents reported that the process for deciding whether a child should remain in the home school was working fairly well. However, they did identify ongoing issues, including difficulty arranging transportation and communications issues. This brief report summarizes the findings from the study and provides key recommendations for the Division of Child Protection and Permanency (DCPP) and family courts.
Advocates for Children of New Jersey. 35 Halsey Street 2nd Floor, Newark, NJ 07102. Tel: 973-643-3876; Fax: 973-643-9153; e-mail: advocates@acnj.org; Web site: http://www.acnj.org
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Annie E. Casey Foundation
Authoring Institution: Advocates for Children of New Jersey
Identifiers - Location: New Jersey