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ERIC Number: ED553391
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 325
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-6336-7
ISSN: N/A
A Mixed Methods Study of High School Dropout Prevention Programs
Hibler, Derrick, Sr.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Walden University
In the United States in 2011, 6,000 students between the ages of 16 and 24 dropped out of high school on a daily basis. Educators have developed numerous dropout prevention programs to address this problem. However, little research exists examining how high school principals and counselors engage students in these programs. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore how high school administrators and counselors encourage students who are at risk for academic failure to stay in school. Dewey's theory of experiential education and Hirschi's theory of social bonding informed this study. Six high school principals and 6 counselors in a county school district in a southern state were interviewed, 114 administrators who worked in dropout prevention programs completed a survey, and 6 school improvement plans and 2 exit-interview plans were reviewed. Analytic techniques of coding and category construction were used to analyze interview responses, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey responses. Results indicated that principals and counselors used common procedures to help students stay in school, such as offering credit recovery programs, making referrals to school-based teams, and conducting individual conferences to monitor academic progress. Recommendations included improving parental involvement in their children's education and helping at-risk students develop positive relationships with teachers and peers to increase engagement in school. This study contributes to positive social change by providing educators with a better understanding of how to help communities support the educational and career goals of at-risk students. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A