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ERIC Number: ED553287
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 281
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-5055-8
ISSN: N/A
A Phenomenological Study of the Impact of Pre-Service and Inservice Training Regarding the Integration of Twenty-First Century Technologies into Selected Teachers' Instruction
Clark, Christopher
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Liberty University
The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study is to understand how in-service teachers with three to five years of experience perceive their pre-service and in-service training regarding the integration of twenty-first century technology into their instruction. Twenty participants from a rural public school system in southeast North Carolina participated. This study attempted to describe the following: (1) How do third through fifth year teachers in one public school district in North Carolina feel about their technological awareness and ability to integrate twenty-first century technologies into their instruction? (2) How do third through fifth year teachers in one public school district in North Carolina describe their college experiences with training them to integrate twenty-first century technology into their instruction? (3) How do third through fifth year teachers in one public school district in North Carolina describe the staff development initiatives aimed at training them to integrate twenty-first century technology into their instruction? Through interviews, a focus group, and the use of the Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) survey, themes were identified that described participant perceptions of the phenomena of twenty-first century technology integration training. Participant reported themes were: (a) high level of confidence and skill when selecting twenty-first century technologies, (b) integration must be planned for, (c) college professors rarely integrated technologies, (d) twenty-first century technology assignments were neither purposeful nor rigorous, (e) integration confidence/competence began during field placements, (f) staff development exposed participants to a wealth of technologies, and (g) staff development lacked focus and purpose. In turn these themes were used in developing a list of best practices as articulated by the participants. The implications are discussed and further recommendations are made for college of education programs and staff development coordinators along with suggestions for future research. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Adult Education; Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: North Carolina