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ERIC Number: ED553117
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 89
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-3400-8
ISSN: N/A
Effectiveness of Teaching Formats on Developmental Mathematics Achievement
Erickson, Kristyanna
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Walden University
The developmental sequence of mathematics courses in most 2-year and 4-year colleges is designed to prepare students to succeed in college-level math courses. That is, students must complete this sequence in order to progress to courses such as statistics, college algebra, precalculus, calculus, and differential equations. Research on the effectiveness of web-based instruction in these developmental courses, combined with student self-efficacy and self-regulation learning strategies, has not revealed how students can be more successful learners. The purpose of this quasi-experimental research study was to examine student success rates in developmental mathematics courses that were delivered in different instructional formats: traditional, lab-based, hybrid, or modular-based. The study was conducted with 766 college students enrolled in an introductory algebra course during the fall 2010 and spring 2011 semesters. The college's final assessment, a 10-question multiple choice exam, was used to determine the students' knowledge of the material. Mean differences in final assessment scores were analyzed using ANCOVA to determine the relative effectiveness of the different types of class format. Results of the ANCOVA analysis and post hoc tests revealed that mean scores for the modular class format were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the mean scores of the other class formats. The implications for social change lie in redesigning current developmental mathematics programs to increase students' success and their eventual transfer to 4-year universities. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A