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ERIC Number: ED552911
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 197
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-2120-6
ISSN: N/A
Assessing an Induction Program Designed to Improve Achievement of Ninth Grade Students Receiving Federal Lunch Benefits
Kost, Charles P., II.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Grand Canyon University
As the number of students living in poverty increases, schools need to employ proactive measures to ensure student success and reduce dropout rates. The freshman year of high school is a pivotal year for the success of the students, as ninth grade students are more likely to have low grades, be absent from school, and be suspended or expelled. Additionally, students from low-socioeconomic homes are more likely to dropout. Freshmen academies, mentor programs, and ninth grade induction programs are interventions that high schools use to minimize the transition from middle school to high school. Combining proven interventions with the latest research on assisting students from poverty, the school targeted for this study developed an induction program that was focused on meeting the needs of students from low socioeconomic homes. The results of this quantitative study determined the impact that participation in a ninth grade induction program had on the grades, attendance, and behavior of students who received free or reduced-cost lunches. Results demonstrated a strong correlation between participation in a ninth grade induction program and student grades in core academic courses. Participation in the induction program also positively influenced student attendance in core academic courses, but showed no effect on their behavior or overall school attendance. These findings conflicted with the results of previous studies and warrant additional research in different settings and with different demographics. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Grade 9; Junior High Schools; Middle Schools; Secondary Education; High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A