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ERIC Number: ED552727
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 162
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2679-8755-6
ISSN: N/A
Family and Individual Predictors of First-Generation and Low Family Income First-Year Undergraduates' Integration at a Midwestern University
Pilotte, Catherine
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Purdue University
This study examined how first-year undergraduates' family background characteristics (i.e., first-generation status and low family income) and individual attributes (i.e., sex, motivation, and best friend attachment) are related to institutional integration (faculty and student integration). Low and non-low family income students (N = 961) completed (a) demographic items, (b) the Institutional Integration Scale, (c) the Academic Intrinsic Motivation Scale, (d) best friend questions, and (e) the Relationship Structures Questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regressions tested the two hypotheses: (a) mother and father education, family income, student sex, motivation, and best friend attachment avoidance and anxiety will contribute uniquely and significantly to student integration; and (b) mother and father education, family income, student sex, motivation, and best friend attachment avoidance and anxiety will contribute uniquely and significantly to faculty integration. Regression results revealed that the hypotheses were partially supported. For hypothesis one, motivation contributed significantly, uniquely, and positively to student integration, and sex and best friend attachment avoidance contributed significantly, uniquely, and negatively to student integration; that is, high motivation, being a woman, and low best friend avoidant attachment contributed uniquely to high student integration. For hypothesis two, income contributed significantly, uniquely, and negatively to faculty integration, and motivation contributed significantly, uniquely, and positively to faculty integration. That is, low family income contributed to high faculty integration, and high motivation contributed to high faculty integration. These findings have implications for college counseling, academic advising, and first-year undergraduate programming and orientation practices. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A