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ERIC Number: ED552701
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 177
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2679-8995-6
ISSN: N/A
Web 2.0 Impact on Business Value at a Federal Government Housing Agency
Lavender, Anthony L.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
The idea of Open Government is an extension of the Electronic Government Act of 2002 which addresses the accessibility, usability, and preservation of government information. The concept of Open Government has evolved into the open government directive that mandates Executive Departments and Agencies to become more open and transparent while embracing an emerging technology such as Web 2.0 technology that allows interactive communication between the government and its citizens. Although many government organizations have begun to leverage Web 2.0 technologies, the emphasis has been on ensuring organizations are more open and transparent rather than focusing on the business value gained from this technology. This mixed methods study examined individual adoption behavior as well as management priorities regarding the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and subsequent business value derived from its use. The results from end users found that individual adoption was driven by each user's perception of usefulness, ease of use, complexity, and a relative advantage gained from using the technology. Conversely, the comments from organization managers indicated that management priorities regarding the adoption and deployment of Web 2.0 technologies were driven by the open government directive and their individual perceptions of usefulness. Furthermore, the results also revealed that individual adoption behavior and management priorities were impacted by social influence (organizational culture) that subsequently impacts the amount of business value obtained from Web 2.0 technologies. These findings advance technology adoption theory within government organizations and contribute to the foundation of future research on the impact of social influence on technology adoption behavior. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A