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ERIC Number: ED552302
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 178
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2679-3653-0
ISSN: N/A
An Analysis of the Role of Preexisting Internal Factors in Collegiate Alcohol Abuse within Membership of Social Groups/Organizations
Fusilier, Kristy D.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
This study utilized the administration of the CORE Drug and Alcohol Survey long form, with the inclusion of 10 additional questions to assess prior history of behaviors, social organization membership status, and reasons for utilization of alcohol, to a representative sample of 2500 college students within a single university in order to determine the extent to which this frequency of high-risk drinking behaviors occur in relation to preexisting internal factors that lead to alcohol abuse between members and non-members of social groups/organizations (i.e., Greeks, athletes, honor societies, etc.), within institutions of higher education. The quantitative research question for this study is as follows: Is there a statistically significant relationship between preexisting internal factors that lead to alcohol abuse and collegiate high-risk drinking behaviors between members and non-members of social groups/organizations (i.e., Greeks, athletics, honor societies, etc.)? Through the utilization of multiple regression analyses, multivariate multiple regression analyses, and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) statistical analyses, there were 3 main relational areas assessed: alcohol use and members of social groups/organizations; relationship between preexisting internal factors that lead to alcohol abuse and collegiate high-risk drinking behaviors; and the role of preexisting internal factors in high risk drinking behaviors regardless of social group/organization membership status. Throughout these different areas, results indicate that members and non-members of social groups/organizations are similar in regards to their alcohol consumption patterns. The results generated from this research study will then allow for the development of initiatives to address the use of alcohol throughout the campus community. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A