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ERIC Number: ED552185
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 161
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2679-3599-1
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Acceptability of Oral Reading Fluency
Rowe, Sarah Stebbe
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Michigan State University
Many schools are adopting a Response to Intervention (RTI) model to support and evaluate learning (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2006). Universal screening and progress monitoring are two essential components of RTI that generally support improved student outcomes (Shinn, 2007). In many schools, teachers collect and use a tool called oral reading fluency for these purposes. Some teachers are resistant to using oral reading fluency due to its disputed validity and their lack of time, resources, and knowledge about how to use these data (Foegen, Espin, Allinder, & Markell, 2001; Roehrig, Duggar, Moats, Glover, & Mincey, 2008; Samuels, 2007; Yell, Deno, & Marston, 1992). With a greater understanding of teacher resistance, school psychologists can address the critical factors that relate to the acceptability, use, and effectiveness of oral reading fluency (National Association of School Psychologists, 2008, p. cxix). The purpose of this study was to explore teacher acceptability of oral reading fluency for universal screening and progress monitoring. First to sixth grade teachers from mid-Michigan completed a survey (N = 164), and 22 teachers attended focus groups. In the survey, teachers reported oral reading fluency to be highly acceptable for universal screening and progress monitoring. Teachers reported that oral reading fluency was slightly more acceptable for universal screening than progress monitoring. Knowledge of oral reading fluency and perceived time for assessment were significantly related to teachers' attitudes toward oral reading fluency. In the focus groups, teachers reported many of the reasons for their attitudes towards oral reading fluency. Implications for future research and educational practice are presented. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Grade 1; Primary Education; Elementary Education; Early Childhood Education; Grade 2; Grade 3; Grade 4; Intermediate Grades; Grade 5; Middle Schools; Grade 6
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Michigan