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ERIC Number: ED552179
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 123
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-9958-3
ISSN: N/A
What Are Professors Doing in the Classroom That Might Attenuate Learning Issues That Challenge Students with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder?
Force, Marilynn
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Capella University
Many students enter the postsecondary classroom with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), but do not disclose their disability for fear of stigma from the school and the instructors they must face. For the past 7 years, this author has noticed that, when instructional designs incorporate practices that meet the needs and learning processes of the student when it is difficult for them to meet the goal of mastery, the subject matter to be learned can be successfully achieved. The purpose of this study was to examine the instructional design practices of postsecondary education, how those practices were developed, established, and implemented. The focus was to compare and contrast whether the established instructional designs could incorporate new instructional designs with the needs of the student with PTSD. New instructional designs were found that can be implemented within the classroom, and attitudes toward instructional design were surveyed to find the attitudes of instructors' approach to helping students within the classroom. The outcome of the survey findings found in this paper that was distributed to a select group of universities supported this author's assumption that, in general, university instructors care deeply about their students' learning the subject material presented in class. However, many of those instructors do not have a formal pedagological base of knowledge in instructional design upon which they can draw. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A