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ERIC Number: ED551634
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 201
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-04846
ISSN: N/A
Relationship between Pedagogic and Course Factors and Student Outcomes in Community College Online Courses
Mager, Marlowe Geoffrey
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Western Carolina University
The purpose of this study was to identify instructor behaviors that lead to positive student outcomes in online courses. The study investigated the relationship between 12 predictive variables and three measures of student success (assignment grade, course grade, and student retention) in online courses. Archived online courses at a rural community college were analyzed for the presence of the predictive variables, with each variable counted within the course and within each course activity completed by each student. Outcome variables were determined through the college's data warehouse and the online courses' gradebooks. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze the predictive value of each predictive variable as it relates to the three outcome measures; the fourth was described in terms of correlations. Student-student interaction and immediacy were significant predictors of all three outcome variables, while other variables were inconsistent across outcomes or were not statistically significant predictors. Course grade was positively correlated with student-student interaction, student formative behaviors, and immediacy. It was negatively correlated with building student capacity. Assignment grade was positively correlated with student-student interaction, student-teacher interaction, student formative behavior, immediacy, and varied teaching activities. It was negatively correlated with number of formative activities in the course and preprogrammed instructor communication. Student retention was positively correlated with student-student interaction and immediacy. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed in relationship to the literature. Recommendations for future research and online instructional practice are suggested. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Two Year Colleges; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A