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ERIC Number: ED551550
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 126
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2678-0835-6
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Trades and Industry, a Career and Technical Education Curriculum, on Student Achievement: A Propensity Study
Siegrist, Michael Scott
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
This study examined whether students who participated in the trades and industry curriculum did better than their counterparts on standardized tests. Data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) High School Transcript Study (HSTS) were used. A nationally represented sample of over 37,000 public and private school students were assessed. The study described the graduating high school students by several covariates. A propensity score was run to find which covariates balanced to satisfy the treatment group. A Kernel Matching Method was run to determine if the trades and industry students achieved a statistical difference over their cohort non-trades and industry students on standardized tests. In all, the study concluded that trades and industry students did not do better than those who did not participate in the career and technical curriculum. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Assessment of Educational Progress