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ERIC Number: ED551499
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 108
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2677-9193-1
ISSN: N/A
Faculty Perceptions and Use of Social Media in the Medical Imaging Curriculum in the United States
DuBose, Cheryl
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, Arkansas State University
Social media networks are a worldwide phenomenon encompassing multiple generations of faculty and students. As the World Wide Web has developed and grown, so has the ability of individuals to communicate across hundreds and thousands of miles via these social media networks. An exploratory survey of members in the Association of Educators in Imaging and Radiologic Sciences was completed and analyzed to determine faculty perceptions and use of social media in the medical imaging curriculum in the United States. Medical imaging faculty were asked if they own a personal social media account, a professional social media account, and if they use social media in the classroom. This study revealed that approximately 74 percent of faculty own a personal social media account, while approximately 46 percent own a professional (networking) social media account. Approximately 69 percent of medical imaging faculty indicated that they incorporate at least one type of social media in the classroom, with YouTube being the most popular social media platform used in all listed subject areas (Introduction, Lab, Procedures, Physics/Exposure, Pathology, Clinical Education, Patient Care, and Radiobiology). Faculty were given the opportunity to provide feedback on the perceived advantages and disadvantages of social media use in the medical imaging curriculum. While 31 percent of faculty believe that social networks take more time than they are worth, 67 percent believe that social media should be used to enhance learning in the medical imaging curriculum. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A