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ERIC Number: ED551333
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 288
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2677-7324-1
ISSN: N/A
Students' Awareness and Perceptions of Learning Engineering: Content and Construct Validation of an Instrument
Duncan-Wiles, Daphne S.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, Purdue University
With the recent addition of engineering to most K-12 testable state standards, efficient and comprehensive instruments are needed to assess changes in student knowledge and perceptions of engineering. In this study, I developed the Students' Awareness and Perceptions of Learning Engineering (STAPLE) instrument to quantitatively measure fourth through eighth grade students' knowledge of, interest in, and efficacy toward engineering. STAPLE was developed using four samples for four separate analyses: content expert review (n = 15), field-test (n = 40), pilot-test (n = 576), and confirmatory test (n = 1,007). Content experts had expertise in either engineering education or gifted education. Students in grades four through eight completed the field-test, pilot-test, and confirmatory test. Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis was used to analyze the dichotomous knowledge items, while factor analysis was used to analyze the six-point scaled interest and efficacy items. IRT analysis of the knowledge items revealed that seven items should be removed from STAPLE in order for the instrument to yield reliable results. Factor analysis on the interest and efficacy items revealed three factors: Interest in Engineering, Efficacy toward Engineering Global and Social Dynamics, and Efficacy toward Engineering Process and Design. Fit statistics were adequate for each of the factors. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that male students had higher mean factor scores for Interest in Engineering and Efficacy toward Engineering, while female students had higher factor scores for Efficacy toward Engineering Global and Social Dynamics. Additionally, students identified as gifted had higher factor scores for Engineering Global and Social Dynamics; however, students not identified as gifted had higher factor scores for Interest in Engineering and Efficacy toward Engineering Process and Design. These results have implications for engineering instruction and interventions. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools; Grade 4; Grade 5; Grade 6; Grade 7; Grade 8; Intermediate Grades
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A