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ERIC Number: ED551301
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 132
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-2677-6796-7
ISSN: N/A
High School to College Drinking Trajectories: Responsiveness to a College Harm Reduction Program
Sullivan, Kristen M. J.
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
Alcohol use is a serious public health concern plaguing universities across the country. Drinking patterns, however, often form before the college years. This retrospective study explores the drinking patterns of 443 first- and second-year college students who violated their university's substance use policies and were mandated to a harm-reduction intervention. Students' high school to college drinking trajectories were identified by endorsing certain risk indicators in high school which were used to create--Low, Moderate, and High--High School Risk Groups. Results indicate that these High School Risk Groups significantly differentiate among high school drinking variables as well as predict college drinking patterns. Responsiveness to a harm-reduction intervention differed by High School Risk Group with the High Risk group showing a decrease on total drinks per week and times intoxicated per month from intake to follow-up. Furthermore, physical and/or sexual abuse and a drug history in high school are associated with higher risk levels. Educational factors such as higher GPA and attendance at public school appear to be protective factors against higher risk levels for alcohol consumption in high school. A three-tiered intervention model is suggested to address the risk levels for alcohol consumption both in college and in high school. This study calls for a continuum of prevention and intervention services to be implemented at different ages, for all risk levels, and for every student, regardless of academic success. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
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Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education; Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A